California to start testing students for dyslexia

On Behalf of | Jan 5, 2023 | IEP |

When a student has certain types of learning needs, it can lead to struggles in the classroom. Students who have these deficits may be entitled to specific types of support from the school through the special education program. Some of the most common learning needs are those related to dyslexia, but California is reportedly one of the few states that does not test all students for this type of reading disability.  

Dyslexia in the classroom 

Statistics indicate that one in five students struggle with dyslexia in the classroom. A screening test implemented by many states flags first-grade readers that show signs of reading struggles. Students with dyslexia often demonstrate trouble connecting sounds with letters, linking words in a sentence and linking sounds to words. This type of screening test would be helpful in California where 60% of third graders in the state are reportedly not reading at grade level. 

Students with undiagnosed learning disabilities are more likely to struggle in school and demonstrate behavioral problems. However, a proposed bill that would implement dyslexia screening died out before lawmakers even had a chance to discuss it. 

What can parents do? 

California parents who have students with learning needs may struggle to get the support they need. They may even have a difficult time getting their child screened for common learning disabilities, such as dyslexia. Parents have the right to seek legal support if they believe the school system is not listening to their concerns, providing appropriate supports and services or following the terms of an Individualized Education Plan (IEP).  

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